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Learning at Manor

Learning takes place in a wide range of ways at Manor, both in and out of the classroom. The children frequently go on educational visits to a wide range of places; they regularly visit art galleries; we have visitors, such as authors, theatre companies, professionals, to school provide an additional layer to the children’s experiences. All these give the children a breadth to their learning that you cannot provide purely in a classroom.

Each year group has a unit each half term that the children’s learning is based around. Learning is planned using the Early Years Foundation Stage Curriculum and the Key Stage 1 and 2 National Curriculum 2014.

Each unit makes connections between subject areas so that the children are able to explore and develop the topic in more depth. It provides the children with meaningful opportunities to develop and use their skills in real situations.

The curriculum provides practical approaches and direct experiences. Children are encouraged and taught to talk about and share ideas in order to develop their language and thinking. To reinforce and develop these skills, in class the children have opportunities to debate, to role play and to give presentations. A very important part of the children’s learning is investigating and problem solving, designing and making things, researching and finding out, as well as learning to use the wide range of ICT that is available to them.

Currently, the school works with 5 other Newham schools and the charity Open Futures to help broaden the experiences of the children’s learning. The work has 4 strands – Ask It, Grow It, Cook It and Film It. Each strand provides practical and real opportunities to deepen the children’s experience and help to improve the quality of their thinking and talking. These strands are linked to the units that classes cover throughout the year. It provides plenty of opportunities for the parents and families to get involved! Go to our Open Futures page to find out more.

Learning is not just about what the children know, but about developing good learning attitudes, and a thirst for learning in order to develop an independent approach.
These essential learning attitudes are:
• Confidence
• Concentration
• Motivation
• Enjoyment
• Perseverance
• The ability to work both independently and cooperatively
• Self esteem


In short, we aim to ensure that all learning experiences are:
• Purposeful & challenging
• Differentiated & interesting
• Collaborative and interactive

 

English at Manor Primary School

At Manor, we recognise that our pupils require a greater emphasis on all
aspects of English to meet the expectations of the National Curriculum.
English skills are taught daily across the school with most children receiving
approximately ten hours of English based learning a week.

Spoken Language
At Manor, we recognise that spoken language is very important to our pupils,
many of whom speak English as an additional language. Modelling
appropriate and expressive speech is an integral part of our teaching, both
within English lessons and across the curriculum.

We believe that spoken language skills are an intrinsic part of the writing
process. A child needs to be to say a sentence before they can write it. As
such, oral rehearsal and communication around writing is carefully planned
for throughout the writing process.

Reading
We recognise that reading is a core tool for life and we aim to foster a love of
reading in our children. We have identified that children need to be heard
reading regularly and be provided with reading opportunities across the
curriculum. The school teaches and develops reading through a whole-class
approach using a balance of short quality texts (Language and Literacy) and
longer texts, such as chapter books. The school further promotes reading by
timetabling (3.00-3.15pm) dedicated ‘Drop Everything and Read’ and class
novel sessions where teachers read high quality texts to promote a love of
reading.

Through reading, pupils are introduced to new vocabulary that can then be
used in their own writing and speech. Time is spent discussing vocabulary –
including the explicit teaching of unknown or technical vocabulary and
investigating double-meaning words, devising strategies to read around a
text for sense.

Manor Primary also promotes the use of the local library service. The school
actively takes part in special events as part of World Book Day and the
summer reading challenges.

Word Reading

Reading is taught discretely at Manor Primary on a daily basis. We use a
systematic approach to teach reading using the Ruth Misken model of RWI.
Pupils are grouped accordingly to the reading ability across phases. Class
teachers have overall responsibility of the teaching of reading within their
class, however, a number of teaching assistants and HLTAs are trained to
teach RWI and have their own group. The RWI leader oversees all groups and
provides on-going support in the delivery.

It reception, focus is on children sounding and blending unfamiliar printed
words quickly and accurately. Children are taught:
 To discriminate between separate sounds in words
 Grapheme-phoneme correspondences
 To apply the skill of blending phonemes in order, all through a word to
read it
 To recognise sight vocabulary identified as ‘tricky words’

It is the aim at Manor, that by the end of KS1, all children should be able to
decode quickly in order for them to be able to develop the breadth and
depth of the reading and become enthusiastic readers. As soon as pupils
can decode and read fluently, they are taken off the RWI programme and
learn through a range of high quality short and longer texts.

Any pupils that are not making expected progress will be identified through
the on-going use of data to inform staff and will receive 1:1 RWI support in the
afternoons.

Comprehension
Comprehension skills are taught across the school. In EYFS, children are
taught and encouraged how to use a range of texts to find information, how
to form their own opinions of a text and share their ideas in a range of
situations.

From Year 1 to the end of Key Staff 2, pupils are taught specific skills which
enable them to decode meaning of a text and how to form and express their
own personal opinions and make comparisons. Teachers use the
performance indicators for reading to question pupils and ensure their
understanding of a text.

Home reading
All children are provided with a choice of fiction and non-fictions books from
the classroom and school library. Classroom bookcases are organised to be
easily accessible. Texts linked to topics will also be displayed and made
available in classes.

Writing
The key skills of composition, planning and drafting, punctuation, spelling,
grammar and handwriting are taught explicitly in the context of English
based sessions. In order to develop children’s writing composition and
stamina, short burst writing is essential at each stage of the journey providing
ample opportunities throughout a week.

All units of work start with a cold task and end with a hot task. Cold tasks are
independent based on the intended outcome of the unit. Personalised
targets are identified to support planning and these are shared verbally and
written down. In addition, children’s responses in the cold task can be used to
support intervention, pre-teaching and key teaching points within the
sequence of work.

Hot tasks are at the end of the learning journey – they demonstrate what the
children can apply independently.

At each stage of the journey, gamification opportunities are sought to
engage learners reinforcing key ideas such as specific areas of grammar
being taught.

The children are provided with model texts which they unpick and contrast
with other texts. Children use these models to make adjustments to create
new texts. Following this, children manipulate the text further – changing the
audience, period of time, viewpoint etc. Children are provided opportunities
to manipulate their writing by writing for different audiences or changing the
effect it has on the reader e.g. changing the vocabulary to alter the mood.
Where relevant, children publish the work that they have produced for a
variety of purposes which may include (but not be limited to) for school
displays; writing to an author or creating a class novel/book.

Each classroom has a ‘Writing Showcase’. This is a dedicated area where
each child in the class has a frame of writing of a piece of work that they are
proud of. A photocopy of the work is placed on the frame for the sole
purpose of children’s work being valued and celebrated. This is updated
throughout the year so that children can see the progress that they are
making.



Maths at Manor Primary School

At Manor Primary School we consider mathematics as far more than simply a core
curriculum topic; it is central to helping children become happy, articulate, reflective and
confident individuals.

Developing numerical fluency prepares children to access a world surrounded by number
and problem solving. It equips young people with key skills such as calculating, estimating,
observing and predicting, which will be used extensively throughout their lives.

We have adopted the Singapore Mastery Approach to the teaching of mathematics,
which aims to develop a deep, long-term and adaptable understanding of Maths through
an inclusive approach where all children achieve. We spend significant time on each
topic to deepen understanding and allow children to master concepts.

At Manor we believe that our teaching of mathematics:
 promotes enjoyment of learning through practical activity, exploration and discussion;
 develops confidence and competence with numbers and the number system;
 develops the ability to solve problems through decision-making and reasoning in a
range of contexts;
 helps children understand the importance of mathematics in everyday life.

All children are given opportunities to:
 develop a sense of the size of a number and where it fits into the number system
(place value);
 become fluent in number facts such as number bonds, multiplication tables, doubles
and halves;
 solve simple problems mentally, using jottings personal to them and the bar model to
visualise the problem;
 use mathematical vocabulary to support their explanations;
 calculate accurately and efficiently, both mentally and with pencil and paper,
drawing on a range of calculation strategies and judging whether their answers are
reasonable;
 explore the features of shape and space, and develop measuring skills in a range of
contexts;
 explain and make predictions using graphs, diagrams, charts and tables.

At Manor, Maths is taught daily following the Maths - No Problem! Primary Programme.
The Maths learning journey is organised into chapters. We start each chapter of learning
with a ‘cold task’ to evaluate prior learning and assess the children’s starting point. After a
series of lessons developing their skills and understanding through the solving of problems
in real life contexts, the children complete a ‘hot task’. This provides the children the
opportunity to apply what they’ve learnt and enables the teachers to assess the children’s
understanding and their ability to apply their learning independently.

Lesson Approach
Each Maths lesson starts with an anchor task: a real-life problem for the children to solve.
The children have the opportunity to explore, explain, record and apply their
mathematical learning and thinking in every lesson. We follow the C-P-A approach, which
encourages children to move from concrete representations (objects/cubes/counters
etc.); to pictorial representations (drawings, bar models, diagrams etc.); before moving to
an abstract representation such as a written calculation. Collaborative learning, talking
and questioning play a vital role in every Maths lesson.

In line with our Singapore Mastery Approach, each child has a Maths Journal and a Maths
Workbook. The journal is a record of their learning journey showing the development of
their mathematical knowledge, skills and understanding and whenever possible should
demonstrate their thought process. The Workbook, is where they practice and apply their
mathematical skills.

Arithmetic
In order to further develop the children’s sense of number we have weekly Arithmetic
lessons, where the children have the opportunity to develop confidence and fluency with
numbers and the four operations, improving their recall of number facts and their concept
of place value.

Children are also encouraged to practice these skills at home.




PE & Sport at Mano
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For more information about what each year group are learning about, click on the year overviews below.

 

Yearly Overviews 2014-2015

EYFS

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Basic Skills Expectations

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

 

 

Yearly Overviews 2013-2014

EYFS

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6